Res Publica Coin Gallery

Ancient coins in the collection of Jordan Montgomery, focused on the Roman Republic and related series. The attributions and information are all verified to the best of my ability but, if I have made a mistake, please leave a comment and I'll do my best to rectify it. For more information about the reference works listed, a bibliography is provided. Additionally, this site is made available purely for informational purposes and none of the coins are currently for sale.

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Cr. 529/4b M Antonius & C Caesar Octavianus AR Quinarius, 39 B.C., Gaul

AntOctavianQuinarius.jpeg ThumbnailsCr. 544/20 Marc Antony AR denarius, 32-31 BC, Leg VII, Patrae(?) mintThumbnailsCr. 544/20 Marc Antony AR denarius, 32-31 BC, Leg VII, Patrae(?) mintThumbnailsCr. 544/20 Marc Antony AR denarius, 32-31 BC, Leg VII, Patrae(?) mintThumbnailsCr. 544/20 Marc Antony AR denarius, 32-31 BC, Leg VII, Patrae(?) mintThumbnailsCr. 544/20 Marc Antony AR denarius, 32-31 BC, Leg VII, Patrae(?) mint

This coin comes from an issue struck to celebrate the reconciliation pact between Octavian and Antony made at Brundisium in 40 B.C.. After the victory at Philipi, Octavian had withdrawn to the West and Antony to the East. The deaths of Antony’s wife Fulvia, and brother Lucius, prompted Antony’s return to Italy, a move which many must have thought meant that war between the two Triumvirs was imminent. Sextus Pompey approached Antony offering an alliance against Octavian, as did Octavian’s own general Salividienus. Fortunately, the Triumvirs were able to come to an agreement which was completed by Antony’s marriage to Octavian’s widowed sister, Octavia. Both men then returned to their respective spheres of influence, where each struck an issue bearing both of their names. Sear suggests that this type was struck under Octavian in Gaul, which had recently transitioned from Antony’s control to Octavian’s due to the agreement at Brundisium. The theme of Concordia, and the prominent placement of Antony on these issues, was likely Octavian’s attempt to sell this agreement and legitimize his authority in an area so recently under the control of Antony and those loyal to him.

Roman Imperatorial period AR quinarius(14.5mm., 1.69g), C Caesar Octavianus and Marcus Antonius, military mint with Octavian in Gaul, late 39 BC. Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right, III•VIR R•P•C around counterclockwise/Two clasped hands holding caduceus, M•ANTON C•CAESAR around counterclockwise. Crawford 529/4b; Sear HCRI 304.

"From a European Collection", Naville Numismatics Live Auction 64, 21 March 2021, lot 470, ex Dr Angelo Signorelli collection, part II, P.P. Santamaria, 4 June 1952, lot 853

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