Res Publica Coin Gallery

Ancient coins in the collection of Jordan Montgomery, focused on the Roman Republic and related series. The attributions and information are all verified to the best of my ability but, if I have made a mistake, please leave a comment and I'll do my best to rectify it. For more information about the reference works listed, a bibliography is provided. Additionally, this site is made available purely for informational purposes and none of the coins are currently for sale.

Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is copyright Jordan Montgomery and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Home / The Social War and the conflict of Marius and Sulla through the Imperatorial Period, 91 B.C.-27 B.C. /

Cr. 476/1a Julius Caesar, orichalcum dupondius, Autumn 45 BC, Rome

KZe32FFqy5xLgZ8Q6pmYH4wC9SWofC.jpg Cr. 449/1a C Vibius C.F. C.N. Pansa AR Denarius, 48 BC, RomeThumbnailsCr. 494/23 P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus AR denarius, 42 B.C., Rome mintCr. 449/1a C Vibius C.F. C.N. Pansa AR Denarius, 48 BC, RomeThumbnailsCr. 494/23 P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus AR denarius, 42 B.C., Rome mintCr. 449/1a C Vibius C.F. C.N. Pansa AR Denarius, 48 BC, RomeThumbnailsCr. 494/23 P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus AR denarius, 42 B.C., Rome mintCr. 449/1a C Vibius C.F. C.N. Pansa AR Denarius, 48 BC, RomeThumbnailsCr. 494/23 P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus AR denarius, 42 B.C., Rome mintCr. 449/1a C Vibius C.F. C.N. Pansa AR Denarius, 48 BC, RomeThumbnailsCr. 494/23 P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus AR denarius, 42 B.C., Rome mint

Roman Imperatorial period Orichalcum dupondius?(17.0g, 28mm). Julius Caesar, dictator, Autumn 45 BC, Rome. Draped bust of victory right, wearing necklace. Wing visible behind shoulder. Before, CAESAR DICT TER/Minerva walking left with trophy over right shoulder and, spears in left hand and shield decorated with Medusa. Snake at feet. C CLOVI PRAEF around. Crawford 476/1a; Sear HCRI 62; RPC 601; Sydenham 1025; BMCRR 4125.

This coin has a strange place in the Roman monetary system as an orichalcum dupondius, unlike anything minted before. This coin was likely minted to be handed out during Caesar's triumph after Munda. Unlike his previous triumphs which were ostensibly celebrating victories over foreign enemies such as Juba(who were allied with Roman armies), this triumph was explicitly celebrating a victory over other Romans, by a dictator who had recently been granted a 10 year term. If this was not the moment that started the plot against Caesar, it very likely gave the conspirators a lot of ammunition for casting him as a dangerous threat to the Republic.

0 comments

Add a comment